People who are planning to undergo surgery often worry about what complications might possibly arise, like infection or items being left inside the body after surgery. Often, these problems never arise, but there are times when the complications become so severe that they can cause problems that the patient would never have expected. A woman in Florida was recently awarded more than $100 million in a medical malpractice suit filed after surgical complications ultimately resulted in the loss of her hands and feet.

It began in 2010 when the patient underwent surgery to remove a benign ovarian cyst. However, during the surgery, her small intestine was nearly severed in two. The doctor closed the wound but failed to inform the patient about what happened, but after the surgery, this injury continued to cause her severe pain. Unfortunately, the problems did not end here. During the surgery, the patient’s blood pressure continued to drop, and she began to show signs of sepsis and even went into respiratory failure.

After the surgery, it was discovered that a flesh-eating bacteria had also been introduced into the patient’s system. This bacteria began eating away at her intestines, stomach and abdominal muscles. Doctors gave the patient medication in an effort to raise her blood pressure, but that same medication limited the amount of blood flow to her extremities. This limited blood flow eventually caused gangrene to set in, which ultimately made it necessary for the patient’s hands and feet to be amputated. 

This woman, who was once worked for the Department of Defense, is now required to live in a rehabilitation center where staff members are available to help her with everyday tasks. Other Florida residents who believe they have been victims of medical malpractice could benefit from speaking with an attorney. Victims of malpractice may be entitled to compensation for medical costs, loss of income or future medical care. 

Source: wtsp.com, “Woman who lost limbs to botched ovarian surgery awarded $109 million by Tampa jury“, Kelsey Sunderland A, Feb. 1, 2018